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Beer & Food

Source: http://www.bcliquorstores.com/en/mattersoftaste/knowhow/beerandfood

First of all, remember that the ultimate decision is a matter of personal taste. But, there are some rules of thumb to help you narrow the options. Generaly, full-flavour foods matches well to full-flavoured beer and vice versa.

What temperature should you serve beer? Well, lagers, bocks, and light-bodied ales should be served at 7-10 degrees Celsius. Most other ales can be served a little warmer at 11-12 degrees Celsius, and heavy ales, porters, and stouts are ideal if served no less than 13 degrees Celsius.

Beer, the versatile beverage. Anything from the light fare at a summer picnic to the spiciest of Asian dishes, the dry, refreshing taste of a beer goes down well. Speaking of spicy dishes, did you know that lagers may cool your tongue more quickly than a glass of water? That's because the alcohol in beer actually dissolves the alkaloids in chilies commonly used in spicy dishes. Ale, on the other hand, pairs very well with sausage, cheese, and red meats. Stronger brews tend to complement fuller-flavoured dishes. A rich ale, fragrant with hops, pairs well with steak or roast beef, while lighter and sweeter brews (a pale, golden ale) can be the perfect partner to a good hamburger. The pronounced acidity, or tart, hoppy flavour, offsets the fatty taste of deep-fried and heavier foods. Fruity and premium ale brings out the best in mature cheddar while beers with a stronger palate benefits the soft, sharper cheeses. Hearty meat stews and, surprisingly, shellfish, pair well with porter and stout. You may see that many times oysters and stout have been acknowledged as one of world's great gastronomic marriages.

Date: May 30th, 2005
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Scott Young, President and Head Instructor Bar Smart Inc.